Montana Voter Bill of Rights

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You have the right to register and cast your ballot. You are eligible to vote if you are:

  •  a U.S. citizen

  • at least 18 years old

  • living in MT for 30 days before the election

  • not currently incarcerated

 

You have the right to use your tribal ID. You may use your tribal ID anytime an election official requests identification. This includes registering to vote, entering your polling place, and resolving any issues with an absentee or mail ballot. 

You have the right to vote if you forgot your ID. You will vote using a provisional ballot. You can bring a copy of your ID to the elections office until 5 pm the day after the election.

You have the right to vote if you are a registered voter - even if your name is not on the list. You will vote using a provisional ballot. Your vote will be counted if elections officials determine that you are eligible to vote.

You have the right to register and cast a ballot if you are still in line when the polls close. Polls close at 8 pm.

You have the right to cast a secret ballot without anyone bothering you or telling you how to vote. You should not be approached by a candidate or issue campaign while casting a ballot.

You have the right to get a new ballot if you did not receive a ballot or your ballot was destroyed. Contact your county elections office for a replacement ballot.

You have the right to get a new ballot if you have made a mistake and have not already cast your ballot. You can:

  • Exchange your absentee ballot for a new one at an elections office; or

  • Vote at your polling place using a provisional ballot, if you do not have your original absentee ballot.

You have the right to get help casting your ballot from anyone you choose, except your employer or union representative.

You have the right vote at an accessible polling place. Ask your county election official to make sure you are assigned to one. You also have the right to vote from your vehicle if a disability prevents you from entering a polling place. A friend or relative may ask an election judge to bring your ballot to your car.

You have the right to have a ballot delivered to you if you are homebound or in a nursing home. Your county election official or a nursing home staffer can tell you how.

You have the right to vote using an absentee ballot, even if you are capable of voting in person on Election Day. You may request an absentee ballot from your county election official any time from 75 days preceding Election Day until noon the day before.

You have the right to vote even if you suddenly become ill or have some other health emergency on Election Day. Before noon on Election Day, ask your county election official or a hospital employee to provide you with an absentee ballot.

You have the right to a Voter Information Pamphlet printed in large type or recorded on tape if your vision is impaired. These are available at your local library.

You have the right to vote if you are serving overseas with the armed forces. See your installation voting officer for more information. Members of your family who are with you overseas and who are registered Montana voters may also vote.

This website was produced by Montana Voices.

Contact us at info@voteinMT.org.

Montana Voices is a civic engagement project committed to ensuring that every Montanan is able to participate fully in our democracy. Our mission is to collaborate on programs related to civic access, voting rights, voter modernization efforts, civic engagement and leadership development. Our mission is centered on engaging and empowering underrepresented communities, building sustainable power needed to eliminate barriers to civic participation, and guaranteeing that policy-making is guided by the public.